why i can't predict the weather past the storm

owning-my-truth:

Taylor Swift’s Racism & “Shake It Off” Video
We clearly need to start a hashtag campaign at this point to #stopracistwhitegirls. Between Miley Cyrus, Katy Perry, Lily Allen and more, the mainstream pop bench is absolutely stacked with racist white girls galore at the moment. But in our 2014 “post racial” America where black people are getting killed every 28 hours by vigilante justice, where Mike Brown’s killer, Darren Wilson, is on paid leave for brutally executing an unarmed black teenager as we speak, and where police brutality against black bodies in Ferguson and across the country is the norm, it’s still so fun and uber cool for white girls to make blackness a costume! You know, since it clearly doesn’t get us killed or anything.
Enter Taylor Swift stage left.

[image description: Taylor Swift in a leopard print jacket with large gold hoop earrings, and cut of jean shorts with a gold chain posturing in front of twerking dancers]
So I’ll admit that I do have a bit of a penchant for bland pop music, and so I have followed Taylor Swift in varying capacities for many years. I understand that her entire image is carefully cultivated to exude innocent, bright eyed and bushy tailed white girl who is always “shocked” when she wins an award. I understand that the reason her image sells is because of the white supremacist patriarchal notion of the “cult of true womanhood,” where moneyed white woman had their femininity defined by 4 traits: piety, purity, domesticity, and submissiveness. It is in this mold that Taylor Swift has built such a massive following and sold so many millions of albums. Ascribing herself to these narrow values by which white womanhood is exalted and elevated in a way that is only accessible to white female bodies and not to WOC has been Swift’s “in” in the music industry more than anything else over the years.
But in the pop industry there is a constant need for reinvention and to push the boundaries ever further with each succeeding musical effort. Even as Swift has cultivated and carefully molded her image to fit this fairly rigid white supremacist patriarchal construct of white femininity and has made millions doing so, the constant churn of capitalism has made the appeal of her wonder bread white girl image fade with time. She needs some way to “spice up” her act and draw attention to herself along with it. As bell hooks so brilliantly says in her cultural criticism & transformation:

There’s a way in which white culture is perceived as too “wonder bread” right now—not edgy enough, not dangerous enough—let’s get some of those endangered species people to be exotic for us. It’s really simply a more up-scale version of primitivism resurging. When blackness is the sign of transgression that is most desired, it allows whiteness to remain static, to remain conservative, and it’s conservative thrust to go unnoticed.

And so, with this in mind, Swift like so many white girls and boys before her, turns to blackness to find that “exotic” flavor to give her bland image the kick it needs. 
What strikes me about the “Shake It Off” video is just how true to form it is with all of the other racist music videos we’ve seen from white women in the past year alone. “Hard Out Here,” “We Can’t Stop,” “23” and more, white girls have been on a roll with their racism and racialized misogyny and Taylor Swift couldn’t wait to join the party.

[image description: Taylor Swift in a red hooded jacket, holding a boom box and wearing a fitted cap in front of black and Latino break dancers]
In one scene from the video we have Taylor Swift dressed as a b-boy with a fitted cap and all, in a brazen and blatant act of cultural appropriation. We all know that the b-boy tradition comes from black and Latin@ youth who get demonized and criminalized daily and who are not able to breakdance without facing harassment from the police. But Swift, drenched in her white privilege and concomitant myopia has no sense of how insulting it is to slip this on as a fun “costume” for a few seconds in her video, as she can always retreat back into her whiteness unassailed while the black and Latin@ breakdancers in her video cannot.
The most disgusting part of the video, though, came, as usual with the twerking scene. White girls just seem to love to throw in a twerking scene into their videos these days. 

[image description: Taylor Swift in a leopard print jacket and gold earrings and chains crawling in between the legs of several twerking dancers and staring up at the butt of a twerking black woman]
This is different from the “Anaconda” video, where black women have agency and control of their sexuality and bodies. Instead, just like her racist white counterparts (namely Miley Cyrus and Lilly Allen), Taylor Swift makes twerking and black female bodies a spectacle before the white gaze. Particularly as she walks between the legs of her twerking dancers and pauses at the black woman in the group and gapes astoundingly at her ass, the white gaze is centralized. In this scene black femininity is clearly exotified and demonized in an animalistic contrast to her conservative white femininity that can gape “shocked” at what she’s witnessing (which black women have literally been doing for centuries). This is white feminism at work, which perpetually ignores crucial intersections of race and gender, and to add insult to injury the scene ends with Swift giggling and looking bashfully at the ground, reifying her innocence and white privilege in the spirit of the cult of true womanhood. These are constructs which black women and other WOC do not have access to due to their race, and which Swift gleefully reinforces with this imagery.
This entire scene is a blatant example of primitivism and misogynoir (racialized antiblack misogyny) in the spirit of the spectacle that people made out of the body of  Saartjie Baartman. 

[image description: Caricature cartoon image of Saartjie “Sarah” Baartman, the “Hottentot Venus.” She is scantily clad with a spear, very large buttocks and her large breasts exposed as well with a white Cherubim alighting on her buttocks]
In case you are not aware, Baartman was a Khoikhoi South African woman, who was brought to Europe in 1810 where she was subsequently paraded around  as a freak show with the “exotic” features of her black female body—her butt, breasts and elongated labia— as the main event. Racist caricatures of her body were made, including the famous cartoon above. After her death, her skeleton, preserved genitals and brain were placed on display in Paris’ Musée de l’Homme until 1974. Her remains were not returned to South Africa until 2002 when she was finally reburied near her home town over 200 years after her birth.
In this video, Swift, like her racist white pop counterparts, taps into the racist traditions that we see in the dehumanization of Baartman. This is absolutely unacceptable. Black female bodies are not foreign, exotic, alien lands for your debasement in a cheap pop video for mass consumption. Black women have agency and deserve humanity and respect. Nobody cares if the dancer was “okay” with being in the scene or not, what we care about is the imagery being produced which enshrines white femininity as the standard and strips black women of agency rather than giving homage and due respect to them (as we see in Rihanna’s “Pour It Up” video, Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda” video and more which centralize the black female gaze).
 But, if we didn’t know before, we’ve learned in the past year that Swift and all of these other white pop stars are simply shameless. They don’t care. We critique and point out their racism and racialized misogyny and they throw out obtuse comments about how they actually “really love black people” and “have black friends,” you name it, rather than accepting the problematic nature of their work and just apologizing. This is white supremacist thinking in action, as the only emotional universe which matters is that of the white individual in question and not that of the black people who object to the debasement of our bodies and commodification of aspects of our cultures in videos like this. And we see the impact of all of this in the thinking of their fans who myopically follow their stars and don’t realize that they can be fan while still being critical of the actions of their favorite pop stars. It is unacceptable that Swift can shamelessly appropriate from b-boy black and Latin@ culture, parade herself around as a faux-black woman and then exotify and degrade black female bodies for mass consumption in her videos. And it’s so important that we call videos like this out, and demand accountability from artists who put out degrading videos like Taylor Swift just did with “Shake It Off.”  #stopracistwhitegirls2k14
Related Posts:
+ Lily Allen’s Racist “Hard Out Here” video
+ Ke$ha’s Racist “Crazy Kids” video


It’s really disappointing that Taylor doesn’t have anyone on her team who would stand up and say “Taylor, no.” View Larger

owning-my-truth:

Taylor Swift’s Racism & “Shake It Off” Video

We clearly need to start a hashtag campaign at this point to #stopracistwhitegirls. Between Miley Cyrus, Katy Perry, Lily Allen and more, the mainstream pop bench is absolutely stacked with racist white girls galore at the moment. But in our 2014 “post racial” America where black people are getting killed every 28 hours by vigilante justice, where Mike Brown’s killer, Darren Wilson, is on paid leave for brutally executing an unarmed black teenager as we speak, and where police brutality against black bodies in Ferguson and across the country is the norm, it’s still so fun and uber cool for white girls to make blackness a costume! You know, since it clearly doesn’t get us killed or anything.

Enter Taylor Swift stage left.

[image description: Taylor Swift in a leopard print jacket with large gold hoop earrings, and cut of jean shorts with a gold chain posturing in front of twerking dancers]

So I’ll admit that I do have a bit of a penchant for bland pop music, and so I have followed Taylor Swift in varying capacities for many years. I understand that her entire image is carefully cultivated to exude innocent, bright eyed and bushy tailed white girl who is always “shocked” when she wins an award. I understand that the reason her image sells is because of the white supremacist patriarchal notion of the “cult of true womanhood,” where moneyed white woman had their femininity defined by 4 traits: piety, purity, domesticity, and submissiveness. It is in this mold that Taylor Swift has built such a massive following and sold so many millions of albums. Ascribing herself to these narrow values by which white womanhood is exalted and elevated in a way that is only accessible to white female bodies and not to WOC has been Swift’s “in” in the music industry more than anything else over the years.

But in the pop industry there is a constant need for reinvention and to push the boundaries ever further with each succeeding musical effort. Even as Swift has cultivated and carefully molded her image to fit this fairly rigid white supremacist patriarchal construct of white femininity and has made millions doing so, the constant churn of capitalism has made the appeal of her wonder bread white girl image fade with time. She needs some way to “spice up” her act and draw attention to herself along with it. As bell hooks so brilliantly says in her cultural criticism & transformation:

There’s a way in which white culture is perceived as too “wonder bread” right now—not edgy enough, not dangerous enough—let’s get some of those endangered species people to be exotic for us. It’s really simply a more up-scale version of primitivism resurging. When blackness is the sign of transgression that is most desired, it allows whiteness to remain static, to remain conservative, and it’s conservative thrust to go unnoticed.

And so, with this in mind, Swift like so many white girls and boys before her, turns to blackness to find that “exotic” flavor to give her bland image the kick it needs. 

What strikes me about the “Shake It Off” video is just how true to form it is with all of the other racist music videos we’ve seen from white women in the past year alone. “Hard Out Here,” “We Can’t Stop,” “23” and more, white girls have been on a roll with their racism and racialized misogyny and Taylor Swift couldn’t wait to join the party.

[image description: Taylor Swift in a red hooded jacket, holding a boom box and wearing a fitted cap in front of black and Latino break dancers]

In one scene from the video we have Taylor Swift dressed as a b-boy with a fitted cap and all, in a brazen and blatant act of cultural appropriation. We all know that the b-boy tradition comes from black and Latin@ youth who get demonized and criminalized daily and who are not able to breakdance without facing harassment from the police. But Swift, drenched in her white privilege and concomitant myopia has no sense of how insulting it is to slip this on as a fun “costume” for a few seconds in her video, as she can always retreat back into her whiteness unassailed while the black and Latin@ breakdancers in her video cannot.

The most disgusting part of the video, though, came, as usual with the twerking scene. White girls just seem to love to throw in a twerking scene into their videos these days.

[image description: Taylor Swift in a leopard print jacket and gold earrings and chains crawling in between the legs of several twerking dancers and staring up at the butt of a twerking black woman]

This is different from the “Anaconda” video, where black women have agency and control of their sexuality and bodies. Instead, just like her racist white counterparts (namely Miley Cyrus and Lilly Allen), Taylor Swift makes twerking and black female bodies a spectacle before the white gaze. Particularly as she walks between the legs of her twerking dancers and pauses at the black woman in the group and gapes astoundingly at her ass, the white gaze is centralized. In this scene black femininity is clearly exotified and demonized in an animalistic contrast to her conservative white femininity that can gape “shocked” at what she’s witnessing (which black women have literally been doing for centuries). This is white feminism at work, which perpetually ignores crucial intersections of race and gender, and to add insult to injury the scene ends with Swift giggling and looking bashfully at the ground, reifying her innocence and white privilege in the spirit of the cult of true womanhood. These are constructs which black women and other WOC do not have access to due to their race, and which Swift gleefully reinforces with this imagery.

This entire scene is a blatant example of primitivism and misogynoir (racialized antiblack misogyny) in the spirit of the spectacle that people made out of the body of  Saartjie Baartman.

[image description: Caricature cartoon image of Saartjie “Sarah” Baartman, the “Hottentot Venus.” She is scantily clad with a spear, very large buttocks and her large breasts exposed as well with a white Cherubim alighting on her buttocks]

In case you are not aware, Baartman was a Khoikhoi South African woman, who was brought to Europe in 1810 where she was subsequently paraded around  as a freak show with the “exotic” features of her black female body—her butt, breasts and elongated labia— as the main event. Racist caricatures of her body were made, including the famous cartoon above. After her death, her skeleton, preserved genitals and brain were placed on display in Paris’ Musée de l’Homme until 1974. Her remains were not returned to South Africa until 2002 when she was finally reburied near her home town over 200 years after her birth.

In this video, Swift, like her racist white pop counterparts, taps into the racist traditions that we see in the dehumanization of Baartman. This is absolutely unacceptable. Black female bodies are not foreign, exotic, alien lands for your debasement in a cheap pop video for mass consumption. Black women have agency and deserve humanity and respect. Nobody cares if the dancer was “okay” with being in the scene or not, what we care about is the imagery being produced which enshrines white femininity as the standard and strips black women of agency rather than giving homage and due respect to them (as we see in Rihanna’s “Pour It Up” video, Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda” video and more which centralize the black female gaze).

 But, if we didn’t know before, we’ve learned in the past year that Swift and all of these other white pop stars are simply shameless. They don’t care. We critique and point out their racism and racialized misogyny and they throw out obtuse comments about how they actually “really love black people” and “have black friends,” you name it, rather than accepting the problematic nature of their work and just apologizing. This is white supremacist thinking in action, as the only emotional universe which matters is that of the white individual in question and not that of the black people who object to the debasement of our bodies and commodification of aspects of our cultures in videos like this. And we see the impact of all of this in the thinking of their fans who myopically follow their stars and don’t realize that they can be fan while still being critical of the actions of their favorite pop stars. It is unacceptable that Swift can shamelessly appropriate from b-boy black and Latin@ culture, parade herself around as a faux-black woman and then exotify and degrade black female bodies for mass consumption in her videos. And it’s so important that we call videos like this out, and demand accountability from artists who put out degrading videos like Taylor Swift just did with “Shake It Off.”  #stopracistwhitegirls2k14

Related Posts:

+ Lily Allen’s Racist “Hard Out Here” video

+ Ke$ha’s Racist “Crazy Kids” video

It’s really disappointing that Taylor doesn’t have anyone on her team who would stand up and say “Taylor, no.”


alsoyesalso:

surfshoggoth:

damncommunists:

ocelhira:

i dont get offended at white people jokes even though im white because: 

  1. i can recognize white people as a whole have systemically oppressed POC in america, which is where i live 
  2. most people when they make white people jokes only mean the shitty white people and i am not a shitty white person 
  3. im not a pissbaby

my white friends that have reblogged this give me life

4. Sometimes I am a shitty white person and the jokes remind me to FUCKIN STOP

Mostly #4, tbh.

white people jokes = POC basically doing me a favor tbh


fengbaohua:

Please remember that the word “riot” has been used to silence Black political action before. It trivializes Black actions as senselessly violent or worse yet, unprovoked. “Riot” is “uncontrolled behavior” or “a public disturbance”.

This isn’t a riot. This is a demonstration. This is a wake up call.


grrspit:

afro-dominicano:

scrapes:

queenqueerqutie:

brown-likeme:

Ladies and gentlemen, Ferguson police.  

…

Straight up white supremacists.

this is exactly how they’ve always talked to us, this is how cops in NY speak to little brown and black kids as young as 12 and 13 up to 18 and 19 and so on. this isn’t because there’s aggression from riots this is just how they speak about us and think of us.

It upsets me that people are always trying to say this is how cops talk to us (yes, I have had a cop point a gun in my face before) and nobody believes it until Anderson Cooper puts it on television.
grrspit:

afro-dominicano:

scrapes:

queenqueerqutie:

brown-likeme:

Ladies and gentlemen, Ferguson police.  

…

Straight up white supremacists.

this is exactly how they’ve always talked to us, this is how cops in NY speak to little brown and black kids as young as 12 and 13 up to 18 and 19 and so on. this isn’t because there’s aggression from riots this is just how they speak about us and think of us.

It upsets me that people are always trying to say this is how cops talk to us (yes, I have had a cop point a gun in my face before) and nobody believes it until Anderson Cooper puts it on television.
grrspit:

afro-dominicano:

scrapes:

queenqueerqutie:

brown-likeme:

Ladies and gentlemen, Ferguson police.  

…

Straight up white supremacists.

this is exactly how they’ve always talked to us, this is how cops in NY speak to little brown and black kids as young as 12 and 13 up to 18 and 19 and so on. this isn’t because there’s aggression from riots this is just how they speak about us and think of us.

It upsets me that people are always trying to say this is how cops talk to us (yes, I have had a cop point a gun in my face before) and nobody believes it until Anderson Cooper puts it on television.

grrspit:

afro-dominicano:

scrapes:

queenqueerqutie:

brown-likeme:

Ladies and gentlemen, Ferguson police.  

Straight up white supremacists.

this is exactly how they’ve always talked to us, this is how cops in NY speak to little brown and black kids as young as 12 and 13 up to 18 and 19 and so on. this isn’t because there’s aggression from riots this is just how they speak about us and think of us.

It upsets me that people are always trying to say this is how cops talk to us (yes, I have had a cop point a gun in my face before) and nobody believes it until Anderson Cooper puts it on television.


Asking why rappers always talk about their stuff is like asking why Milton is forever listing the attributes of heavenly armies.

-Zadie Smith on Jay-Z in The New York Times Magazine, "The House That Hova Built".

An interview with Smith and one with Mr. Shawn Carter.

(via nprfreshair)

But still I think “conscious” rap fans hope for something more from him; to see, perhaps, a final severing of this link, in hip-hop, between material riches and true freedom. (Though why we should expect rappers to do this ahead of the rest of America isn’t clear.)


amaditalks:

Before you posit that Elliot Rodger must have been mentally ill because stable people don’t do what he did, did you say that about the 9/11 hijackers or the 7/7 bombers or the Beslan school hostage takers or assailants of Mumbai?

No, because they were terrorists?

Well why were they terrorists? Because they had a true belief - one that was possibly written down - an agenda, made a concrete plan, and then carried it out?

What, exactly, is the difference?


Díaz discussing his interest in sci-fi, post-genocidal worlds as an expression of the urban, Reagan-era Latina/o experience full of disillusionment, crime, AIDS, and poverty – laughter. Díaz using a semi-anecdotal metaphor for male-privilege - laughter. His sprinkling of comedy was misinterpreted by the audiences’ constant and consistent chuckles. He was actually demonstrating the lunacy of our societal context, proven by their amusement. Everything asked to Díaz by the facilitator and crowd was met with a purposeful and targeted response that nudged at the underlying racism inherent in the questions. And when he grew tired of the participant’s unwillingness to truly grasp his complex engagement, he was vocally – but calmly – direct. ‘Save the clapping for your fucked up politicians,’ was one comment that shocked some. ‘White people need to shut the fuck up,’ was another. But the crowd still laughed. Ha. Ha. Ha.

Junot Díaz and the White Gaze - La Respuesta magazine (via larespuestamedia)

read the whole thing holy shit

(via navigatethestream)

Fiction Week

Absolutely read the whole thing. It’s brief and and makes a lot of impact.

(via squintyoureyes)


fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.

fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.

Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.