why i can't predict the weather past the storm

Díaz discussing his interest in sci-fi, post-genocidal worlds as an expression of the urban, Reagan-era Latina/o experience full of disillusionment, crime, AIDS, and poverty – laughter. Díaz using a semi-anecdotal metaphor for male-privilege - laughter. His sprinkling of comedy was misinterpreted by the audiences’ constant and consistent chuckles. He was actually demonstrating the lunacy of our societal context, proven by their amusement. Everything asked to Díaz by the facilitator and crowd was met with a purposeful and targeted response that nudged at the underlying racism inherent in the questions. And when he grew tired of the participant’s unwillingness to truly grasp his complex engagement, he was vocally – but calmly – direct. ‘Save the clapping for your fucked up politicians,’ was one comment that shocked some. ‘White people need to shut the fuck up,’ was another. But the crowd still laughed. Ha. Ha. Ha.

Junot Díaz and the White Gaze - La Respuesta magazine (via larespuestamedia)

read the whole thing holy shit

(via navigatethestream)

Fiction Week

Absolutely read the whole thing. It’s brief and and makes a lot of impact.

(via squintyoureyes)


fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.
fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.
Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.

fixatedonsinister:

So I never do things like this, but I had a horrible week of ableism and fatphobia— a physical therapist working with my leg issues made a bunch of problematic comments, my endocrinologist fat-shamed me for needing a change in diabetes meds, and then a mental health professional suggested i’m only fat because “i’m subconsciously using my size to keep people away and hide from my fear of sexuality.” UGHHH. So I made a fat disabled sexuality photoset to cleanse my life of that toxic shit.

Image description: photo set of a fat light-skinned Latina with long curly brown hair [a wig]. First pic: lying on a bed holding a sign that reads “gorda, discapacitada, y que!” 2nd pic: in a manual wheelchair wearing black lace lingerie/thigh highs, holding a sign that says “my body is not a symptom of my mental illness.” (and it would be ok if my body was, too). 3rd pic: standing with a cane in same outfit, with a sign reading “health disability pride at any size” in graphic design style. 4th pic: standing in red and black lingerie/thigh highs, posing with her cane and medications. 5th pic: kneeling on a bed holding a sign reading “fat disabled dykes do it better | or don’t-do-it better, bc consent is impt. and sexiness is not a requirement 4 anyone.” 6th pic: in her wheelchair with arched back/head (implications of sexual arousal) with a red background/rain coming down filter added to the photo.


http://hellotailor.tumblr.com/post/69118081352/class-snuggle-his-body-isnt-even-cold-yet-and →

class-snuggle:

His body isn’t even cold yet and the New York times has already put out a shameful article declaring Nelson Mandela to be an “icon of peaceful resistance”. News outlets around the Western world are hurrying to publish obituaries that celebrate his electoral victory while…


wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post
wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.
@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.
"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.
Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.
The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.
Information:
#FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face - this is my Storify mentioned above; includes many tweets (including some of mine) by Black women who spoke out; includes tweets from a trans woman of colour (@HarmonyBabydoll) who added an important dimension to this conversation.
The Myth of “Fast Black Girls” by @LexiScorsese - inspired this conversation
Hood Feminism blog
Misogyny, In General vs. Anti-Black Misogyny (Misogynoir), Specifically
Black Men and Patriarchy, Intraracial Sexism and Misogynoir (multiple essays listing) 
Abuse Culture: Domestic Violence, Rape, Body Dehumanization and Street Harassment (multiple essays listing)
Patricia Hill Collins’ books: Black Feminist Thought and Black Sexual Politics speaks to the roots of this stereotype.
Womanism, Black Feminism and Race In Feminist Discourse (Updated)  (multiple essays listing) 
Keep learning, growing and healing. ❤
(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.) 

For more commentary

v important post

wocinsolidarity:

reverseracism:

gradientlair:

TRIGGER WARNING: misogynoir, violence, harassment, sexual abuse, rape.

@HoodFeminism (which is @Karnythia's and @thewayoftheid's work) hosted a Twitter discussion regarding the stereotype of “fast tailed girls” that Black girls deal with primarily during adolescence, but certainly starts before that for many Black girls and continues well into adulthood (i.e. the Jezebel controlling image). I put many of the tweets shared in this discussion in a Storify: #FastTailedGirls: Examining The Stereotypes and Abuse That Black Girls Face though a few are included above.

"Fast tailed" girls: Black girls stereotyped as “hypersexual” beings and seeking sex whether or not they are sexually active. This stereotype is proliferated in the home (especially by some mothers and older women), within the Black community (i.e church, socially; especially by the Black men who abuse and by some Black male leaders who want this silenced) and amidst society itself (i.e. schools, media; because of racism and White supremacist notions of womanhood). These Black girls are viewed: as “adult” women “asking” for abuse,” as responsible for the abuse that primarily adult Black men inflict on them or coerce them into and often inflict without punishment let alone blame from the Black community (as “protecting” Black men from racism often takes precedence over any other intraracial issue); as providing consent simply by experiencing puberty (or not even experiencing puberty); as automatically heterosexual; as automatically culpable for any street harassment, physical violence, sexual violence or emotional abuse that they experience. A Black girl with confidence who speaks up for herself, wants to express her femininity visually, has a normal interest in boys, gets unwanted attention from adult men, and/or has male friends can easily be labeled as such. This stereotype sits in a binary opposed to “respectable" Black girls while both "types" of Black girls are regularly abused. It is the hatred of Blackness, womanhood and childhood (or rejection of a period of childhood actually existing for Black girls) intersecting in this dangerous stereotype.

Though difficult of course, this conversation was so important and I am grateful to Hood Feminism for their presence, in general, and for this conversation, specifically. It is important to discuss how within and outside of our communities internalizing the hateful messages about Blackness, womanhood and Black womanhood specifically has caused so much harm, much irreversible. What can change is how we think about ourselves as Black women, meaning ending shaming and ending buying into patriarchal binaries about Black girls and Black women while simultaneously protecting abusers. Have open conversations about how patriarchal masculinity is literally killing men, Black men in particular, and how while it is true that they are very much so oppressed via race, as all Black people are, they are also oppressors of Black women. Black women also support this structure when abusers are defended and protected and our truths and experiences are silenced by other Black women and anyone else among Black people; that has to end. Deconstructing and rejecting the way that racism, White supremacy, anti-Blackness and sexism create this stereotype for Black girls, ones that impact them inside and outside of the Black community.

The abuse has to end. The education has to be received. The compassion has to be shared. The unlearning has to commence. The truth has to be spoken, even if at 140 characters at a time. Even if in small groups and in supermarket aisles and schools and churches and anywhere. Black girls deserve better than this. Black women deserve more than the pain of the memories of abuse and the fear that another generation of Black girls will experience the same.

Information:

Keep learning, growing and healing. 

(Please leave content above intact if you reblog. Please take care before adding any comments to this post. It is very serious and very painful for many Black women. Victim blaming and statements supporting rape culture are unwelcome here by people who think they have a “right” to harm us because this conversation occurred publicly. Please be respectful.

For more commentary

v important post


tsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTISTtsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years
1996 Benetton
1996 UK
1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
2002 Via the UK
2002 National Union of Students
2003 Red Cross of Finland
2004 campaign via the UK
2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW


HE’S A DENTIST

tsarbucks:

amroyounes:

The Strongest Anti-Racism Ads Of The Last 20 Years

  1. 1996 Benetton
  2. 1996 UK
  3. 1999 campaign via the UK by the Commission for Racial Equality
  4. 2001 For the National Congress Of American Indians
  5. 2002 Via the UK for the National Assembly Against Racism
  6. 2002 Via the UK
  7. 2002 National Union of Students
  8. 2003 Red Cross of Finland
  9. 2004 campaign via the UK
  10. 2007 A More Perfect Union via the USA

WOW

HE’S A DENTIST


So, what’s wrong with the generalization that more sex = liberation? It locates sexual liberation in an experience of white heterosexual femininity. It does not take into the account the different experiences of racialization and sexualization of women, queer and trans people of color. For example, while, straight, middle-class women have been stereotyped as pure, asexual virgins, while women of color have been hypersexualized as exotic, erotic beings (see: Hottentot, harem girl, lotus blossom, fiery Latina, squaw, etc.) For racialized people, adopting a sex-positive attitude does not “liberate” them of such stereotypes, in fact, it fuels them further. In addition, the framework of sex-positivity does not offer a critique of capitalism and the way our sexualities are commodified and exploited, preventing the “free expression” of sex, in the favorite words of sex-positive feminists. Sex-positivity is also ahistorical; it does not take into account the ways attitudes about sex are related to histories of colonialism, especially the colonial imposition of gender and sexual norms. None of this is a particularly new way of thinking by the way, many feminists of color have critiqued sex-positivity for similar reasons.

Shout-outs to counterstorytelling (aka Mushroom Rage) for this thoughtful, wonderful op-ed that spoke so many truths on so many levels. This article is probably the one where topics of feminism, gender, construct, colonialism, culture, and sexuality all intertwine— not just systemically, but personally as well.  (via thephantomcatalyst)